National Libraries Day – get in!

 

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It hardly seems like a year since the last one, but here it is again – Saturday Feb 6th is National Libraries Day! What a year its been. Despite huge evidence of the beneficial contributions that libraries and librarians make to their communities, we are still witnessing the decimation of our library service. The library campaigners have been working flat out to try to save the libraries in their communities, and we owe them a great debt of gratitude for all their hard work. National Libraries day gives us the opportunity to show our appreciation for our libraries and the people who work in, and for them.

National Libraries Day is a grassroots celebration led by library staff and library users. It is supported by CILIP and a coalition of leading literacy, reading, library and education organisations including the Reading Agency, the School Library Association and the Society of Chief Librarians, top authors, and you!

NLD is an opportunity for everyone to step up and show just what their library means to them, and here are some ideas for how you can get involved too. It doesn’t matter where you are in the country, there is a way for you to show that you value our libraries and librarians, and that you don’t want to imagine a future without them.

Retweet our message:  Send a strong message to your followers – something like “I’m sending a message that I love libraries & the wonderful work done by librarians.” RT to celebrate National Libraries Day #librariesday

Share your support on social media
Follow @NatLibrariesDay and sign up to our Thunderclap. Download the #librariesday social media frame and share your library pictures

Share a library shelfie or two with caption /comment and share or tweet it using #librariesday

Lend your talents – Write or create something – could you find the time to write a blog, letter or create a piece of work about what libraries mean to you?

Visit a library – If you can get out to a library, take some photos and show us where you are. Show us what is interesting and unique about your library.

Find an event near you – get out and get into your local libraries (with our without chocolates!). Tell them who you are and let them know that you support them. The NLD map on the website will show you where the registered events are.

Oh, and don’t forget the Elmer the Elephant competition!

As you will still feeling all passionate and full of library love – join us when we lobby Parliament to save our libraries. This event will take place on February 9th and you can find all of the details on the Speak Up For Libraries website.

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Keep the momentum going and sign the CILIP petition to legally challenge the handling of our public libraries. Support, sign and share the My Library By Right petition and use #mylibrarybyright

 

Dawn Finch

President Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP)

Children’s author and proud librarian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Librarians – let’s get out there!

This is a transcript of the closing speech for the joint CILIP Ireland / LAI conference in Belfast in April 2015.

Libraries – advocate and motivate!

Many of us work in isolation and conferences like this are our only chance to meet the other people who work within our service. We are unlike any other industry in that we largely work alone or in very small groups. To be able to attend extraordinary events like this not only keeps us up to date with what is new and current in our industry, but it allows us to discover that we are not alone in our trials and our adversities.

Libraries have never been at greater risk. Never. I have worked in libraries for over 27 years – through several restructures and reevaluations and reshuffles and several other things that regardless of the label hung on it meant job losses and a deterioration of the service available. This apparently was not enough and the erosion of the service has continued and has led us to this place where we are now. Thanks to the Seighart report we are now matched with railways and we are experiencing our Beeching moment. Actually, I think that this is an understatement. After Beeching it was still possible to catch a train, and the system is still recovering, but it is recovering. The same will not be said of libraries. When we lose our libraries they will be lost forever. This will be a single track line and there will be no recovering. No philanthropists will step in and rebuild. Losing our libraries will be an irreversible process.
So what can we do?

Of course our biggest problem is with governments and their inability to take the time to understand what libraries and librarians do and to find out exactly how important they are. This is largely because the people in power have a limited experience of libraries that is essentially an oak panelled silent room in their old prep-school or a silent brandy-fuelled room at the club reeking of aged and over-stuffed old-boys and cracked leather armchairs. They feel that it is fine to protect that sort of library, but do the poor and huddled masses really deserve access to that?

One of the most crucial outward problems facing libraries today partially rests in the perception of libraries. There still exists a perception that libraries are a middle-class remnant of a stuffy past that has no place in the 21st century. If we step outside into the streets and ask people to describe what a library is there is a very good chance that people will still describe this….

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Is this not what a library looks like?

Why do we bristle at this statement – because we know it to be false. We know that when people think of libraries they really should be thinking of spaces like this.

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This is the plan for the new National Library of Kazakhstan and it is a far better illustration of what we know a modern library looks like. We have dozens of examples of such modern community hubs and we know that our libraries are essential and lively 21st century spaces that serve our communities (be they schools, universities or academic establishments) We know that our communities would be significantly less successful without our presence. We know this because we are in these libraries every day and we are able to track their impact.
How do others know? What are we doing to ensure that the wider community is aware of the importance and impact of libraries?

So often all that the non-library using public see of libraries is when another campaign starts. Campaigns do work, especially noisy ones, but the most effective campaigns are ones that bring to bear the power of hearts and minds. We can’t expect people who have never used a library to understand what a librarian does or what a library can do for them – we have to show them. We have to make our voices heard in a way that is positive and affirming.

So how can we do this?
Use your users. One of the problems that we have with library campaigns is that it is often perceived as people just trying to protect their jobs – jobs that people do not understand or value. We need to better demonstrate what we mean to the people who use our libraries. Use your users to write about about what the library means to them, not what it means to you. A perfect example of this is the recent blog post at CILIP about prison libraries.

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Ex-prisoner Jonathan Robinson – a man who really understands how vital libraries and librarians are to the process of rehabilitation.

How much more effective is it to hear the voices of people whose lives have been changed for the better by the support of the library and the librarian? We actually have no shortage of support, but it is directing that support to the right people that can make a difference. Find out who has the most potential impact in your field or your county and get them on your side. Use the famous, use writers, broadcasters, sports personalities, local youth workers, schools, anyone who can be useful to get the message to a wider and more responsive audience.

Make sure that you are concentrating on the impact of the professional. Many library campaigns concentrate on the impact of the service, and not those delivering it. Talking about the professional is our job and we should be doing it as effectively as the campaigners are doing with the service. When you talk about digital literacy, make sure that you talk about the librarian that will deliver this service. It is not enough to save a library to have it staffed with volunteers, no matter how well meaning they are – this is not a sustainable system. Talk about the librarians and show why they are important.

Stay positive. As library campaigners it is vital that we stay positive about the benefits and usefulness of a well-run library. As a life-long campaigner for change I know that the angrier the campaign, the less people listen. These are stressful financial times for everyone, and so people need to feel something on an emotional level to stand by you and make a difference. Yank those heartstrings with positive tales and case histories and show the benefit and wider value of your library to its users.

Be seen! Be seen as an individual, not just as a faceless organisation. This is not just about a building with books in. A building with books in is not a library – no matter what the government would have people believe. You cannot run a library with volunteers – that is just a book lending service and that’s a completely different thing to a real library service. Make sure that people can see you and, in turn, that they understand what you do.
Blog, tweet, facebook, speak, get out there! Join with others and support each other. Conferences are the perfect opportunity to network and to show support for others. Take every opportunity to forge new links and new bonds with anyone who does what you do.
Show people what we do – show them that we are not just sitting there reading and waiting for a book to stamp out. Show people what you do in your service point and how you do it.

So what do we do? Who are we? Why do people deserve a real librarian and not a volunteer? This slide explains exactly what we do and why we are so essential to supporting our communities.

Qualified professionals infographicOne of the key elements of the campaign to erase the library service relies in part on all of us in the profession having divisions. It relies on academic libraries not supporting school libraries, public libraries not supporting health libraries, legal libraries not supporting prison libraries. We need to unite to ensure that we are providing an intermeshed and overlapping service – one access point effortlessly linking to the next.

Show your societal value. We do the most important job. We live in a time where the quantity of information available increases every second. With each passing moment the world faces another tide of information and only one sector of society can help to ride that wave and not drown.

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There has been a great deal of talk about the current government’s pledge to commit 7.4m towards wifi in public libraries and the campaign for digital literacy. We all know why this is so important. Those who are digitally literate have greater personal freedom and earn more.
People with good ICT skills earn between 3% – 10% more than those without.
72% of employers would not even interview entry level candidates with no ICT skills.

Who is at the cutting edge of this digital literacy revolution?
We are.
Our sector.
We are the only ones in the right place to provide management of that knowledge in all its forms and to help people to access and organise it. We are all that stands between the population and fifty million hits on videos of cats riding vacuum cleaners. We are the information conduits, we are the managers of information and we need to make sure that people understand how important this is.

These are dangerous times for libraries, librarians and for anyone who works in knowledge management. This is the time to represent a unified front. This is the time to unite and speak as one to stop the rot that threatens to destroy our libraries. If this destruction is allowed to happen, there will be no going back. If public libraries fall then there is a genuine risk that other information service points will fall in their wake. If we lose access to the unique skills that only a librarian can offer we will become weaker as a nation because of it.

Stick together, build networks, cross services and make sure that people realise that this is not just about buildings and property assets, this is not just about wages or cutting costs for local government, this is about the professionals who provide a service that ultimately improves the quality of life for every single member of our 21st Century communities.
This is what truly makes a library – a librarian.
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The harsh truth about volunteers.

Please note – blog posts automatically close after 50 days.

As always I am pleased to read of any county that announces that they have “saved” their libraries, but I am increasingly seeing that this act of supposed salvation comes at a cost. That cost is losing trained and professional staff, i.e librarians.
Many County Councils are now announcing that their libraries will be “saved”
and that thanks to their glorious new restructuring it will instead be run by “skilled volunteers”
Hmmm, let’s have a look at the truth and workability of that statement shall we?

I’ve worked in the service a long time and (because I’ve worked my way up) I’ve seen pretty much every aspect of it. I’ve worked as a volunteer, and I’ve worked with them, and I’ve organised them. The truth about volunteers is a harsh one, and I apologise to any volunteers if they know that this is not them, but in my experience the points below show the truth of what happens when you rely on volunteers in the long term.
Fine (and incredibly helpful) to use them for occasional top-ups (for example during the hugely busy Summer Reading Scheme season) or for supporting outreach services, such as book deliveries for the housebound or for care homes, but not for core or essential services.
Apart from the obvious denigration of the skills of trained professionals, why can’t we use volunteers for everything?
Here are a few reasons why….

You can’t timetable them.
Volunteers want to work at a time that suits them, not you and not the service. You can’t insist that they work late evenings and weekends like paid staff. They will only work at a time that is convenient for them. Of course they do, they are volunteers and have no contract of employment with you so why should they work when you want them to work?

They cancel at a moment’s notice
That’s because they can. They are not being paid and so if the boiler man wants to come round, they cancel. Waiting on a delivery? Cancel. Daughter popped round for lunch? Cancel. Bit of a hangover? Cancel. Lovely sunny day so decided to have a day out instead? Cancel.
Of course they can do this, they aren’t being paid! You have no right to expect them to come in and no contract of employment to force them to so they have every right to ditch.

You have little or no recourse when they are bad at what they do.
I’ve worked with many volunteers and I remember a good number of ladies who were long term volunteers for the housebound. They were rude. No two ways about it, they were rude, controlling, aggressive and arrogant. We could do nothing at all about this because they were volunteers and without them several housebound people would have no contact with another living soul from one week to the next. We couldn’t sack these ladies or demand they modify their behaviour because we had no contract of employment with them (see the pattern beginning to emerge?)

You can’t insist that they undergo extensive training.
It takes a vast amount of training to deliver a successful library service at the frontline. You can’t insist that your well-meaning volunteer attend several dozen courses to be able to deliver that service because they are just volunteers and you have no legally binding contract of service with them.

You can’t insist on an apolitical standpoint.
Some volunteers may well have strong political leanings that will influence their responses and the way they deal with the public. You can not enforce an apolitical standpoint upon them because they are volunteers and you have no contract with them to ensure that they only express neutrality.

They are not protected in the event of injury or incident.
I have known a good number of librarians who have been injured during their work. This ranges from people who have put their backs out to people who were punched and one who was stabbed. These staff members were supported by their employers and were able to get well and were supported through various crises. You can’t do that with volunteers (no contract remember!) and so their only recourse will be to sue the county. Good luck with that!

They only do what they want to do.
Yes, shelving a couple of hundred books can be boring, so is heaving a load of deliveries around or doing an extensive weed or stock check – but it’s all part of the job. It’s much more enjoyable mooching around in the reference section, or looking through new books, or chatting with your friends who just happen to have dropped by. Library assistants on a contract can be instructed to do the dull stuff because they are paid to. People who have no pay and no contract don’t want to do the dull stuff – why would they? They start off agreeing to, but all too soon you are drowning in returns and the shelves are a mess with things put back incorrectly. In my experience it takes about three weeks for someone to get to the NAD method of shelving (Near As Dammit)

The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
Some volunteers will inevitably abuse their power. These will be the most reliable volunteers in terms of available time and they will make your libraries less pleasurable places to visit. They will be controlling and suffocating and will turn people off visiting the library. You can’t do anything about this because you have no contract of employment with them and can’t insist that they modify their behaviour.

They drift off.
In the beginning you will have lots of volunteers. Plenty of people will come forward and say that they will help out and for a while you will be overwhelmed by the lovely support your library has.
This will not last. In a year or two you will be left with a tiny core of people who are still devoted, but who are essentially running the library on their own. You will be completely reliant on the two or three people who remain loyal, and they will be working full-time equivalent hours in a desperate attempt to keep the place open. If there is one paid librarian left in the building to oversee this (and I stress the “if” there) they will be on a zero hours contract that occasionally affords them a day off, but otherwise requires them to work every late, and every anti-social day (such as Saturday and Sunday) due to the lack of available volunteers.
It will become virtually impossible to get more volunteers because in a more rural community you may have simply exhausted all available people, and in most areas people will tire of working that hard for free. Students will graduate and get jobs, and other people will find that it no longer fits with other aspects of their lives. Most will simply find it tiresome and demanding and they will gradually drift away. You can do nothing about this because they are volunteers and you have no contract with them over things like working hours, or the need to notify you a good time in advance that they no longer wish to do it.

They don’t really know what they are doing.
No offence intended to volunteers here, but the scale of work expected of them is a bit terrifying! Being a librarian is a hugely complex task that involves an incredibly broad skillset. I’ve been doing this for over a quarter of a century and I pedal hard to keep up with all the relevant changes that impact the library service and how we deliver that to our customers. I don’t have all the answers to enquiries from members of the public, but I sure as hell know where to find them. This is because I’m a professional – not a volunteer. You can’t expect volunteers to be able to do this. Customers will soon be frustrated by not being able to ask a question and receive the correct answer, and so they will simply stop asking, and will stop using the library. Catch 22.

This is just a very small snapshot of the potential barriers to delivering a quality service only using volunteers. I have had many wonderful and supportive volunteers in my time (and I thank them and they know who they are and I was able to do a better job thanks to them) but they operated with me, and ultimately the buck stopped with me – the paid and experienced professional. I am a strong willed person who was perfectly prepared to tell a volunteer that I no longer required their services, and so I was able to work with people who stuck at it and were superb – but that meant that I went from dozens down to three who were actually reliable and trustworthy – and that was in a school where I was lucky enough to have access to well-educated and involved parents.
When I was in public libraries it was a genuine nightmare keeping reliable and effective volunteers, and it was far worse for my colleagues who were in poorer or more rural locations.

We, as members of the public, deserve better. We deserve (and are legally entitled to) a library service that delivers not only books but is a free public access point to information. We deserve someone qualified in knowledge and information management who is best able to provide that service – and that’s a real librarian.
This is not just about saving jobs, it’s about communities receiving that which they are legally entitled to. If all of your health visitors or community pharmacies were run by volunteers you would not accept it – don’t accept it from your one and only community information point either. Don’t let the Powers That Be convince you that you can find out all the information you require on your own, that’s a fallacy. You can find out all the legal information that you need on the Internet – but at some point you will need a trained professional to help you. Imagine if it was accepted that solicitors could be unqualified volunteers too? Or nurses?
Yes, you can wrangle around on the Internet when you have a question about issues that affect you locally (or nationally) and then you can wade through 50,000+ pages of disorganised information hoping you’ll strike upon the right one. Or, you can visit the information and knowledge management specialist in your community (aka the librarian) and ask them and they’ll give you the right answer.
You can’t rely on a volunteer to do that. If you are tempted to volunteer, don’t. You will not be protecting your public library by volunteering, you will only be supporting a fatally flawed scheme that will eventually bring about its demise.

Running libraries on volunteers is not a cheap and effective way of saving your local library service, it is a carcinogenic scheme that will ultimately kill it.

Dawn Finch Library and Literacy Consultant
Children’s Author

Footnote – ALL OPINIONS ARE MY OWN.
IF YOU ARE UNDER A GAGGING ORDER AND WISH TO CONTACT ME IN CONFIDENCE, PLEASE USE THE CONTACT FORM ON www.dawnfinch.com

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Library Campaigns – Bring the noise!

2015 rolls us towards one of the most potentially interesting General Elections that the UK has ever seen. At the present time the country is governed by a jumbled pairing of parties that no one actually voted in, all carrying the baggage of policies that didn’t come to pass, and stacking up a whole mess of broken promises.

All of this confusion has left most of us unsure of who to vote for. The lines between the parties have become increasingly blurred, and it is genuinely difficult to put a white paper between them. People deserve to understand the policies that are relevant to their lives and to their communities. We need access to information more than ever, and yet never has it been more convoluted and confusing. We need a way to access information and, once upon a time, this was simple thanks to the public library. I firmly believe that every community is best served by access to a well run and appropriately funded library service, however this service has never been more at risk.

Despite cross-party claims of support, and claims to be supporting a push for raising levels of national literacy and digital inclusion, there have never been more libraries at risk of closure.

As a follow-up to my post about what public libraries actually do, I attempted to gather together links to petitions and campaigns that are trying to save this essential aspect of our lives.  It is incredibly sad just how many libraries are under threat. I was curious as to just how many libraries and regions were affected, and my research made tragic reading. As my list became longer and longer, it became apparent just how potentially catastrophic this all could be.

The removal of library services not only means the loss of something irreplaceable for all of our communities, but also represents a significant breakdown in the democratic process of local government.  The campaigns in some of the regions might appear small, but that’s because the worst hit communities are often small, rural and poor. It is a shameful government that makes the most vulnerable and voiceless a target, but this has happened time and time again under this one.

The campaigns to protect libraries are not about protecting something antiquated and stuffy, or about saving  a twee manifestation of upper middle-class ideals, this is about protecting a service that not only makes a positive difference to all members of the community but one that actively improves the quality of the lives of its users.

We have all read many articles about the importance of raising the levels of national literacy, of the need to ensure digital literacy for all, of the positive impact of reading on educational levels, of how we have more students than ever, and of the need for more open communication of information to the people of the UK. So why would anyone want to cut the most successful way of dealing with all of those issues? Why would the parties not want to support the only service in the community that can tackle all of these issues at the front-line? The Sieghart Report on public libraries highlighted the fact that 35% of people use their libraries; so why would a government cut something that is used by over a third of the population?

The answer is – because it’s easy. It is easier to cut something that people in power don’t understand than it is to cut other more high-profile (and potentially political-career damaging) areas. It is easy to cut something that is used by over a third of the population as long as most of those users are too young to vote, or too vulnerable to fight back. It’s easy to attack those who do not have a loud enough voice to be heard when they protest. It is easy to cut services that some people have a false image of, and it’s easier to cut services where people have less fight.

So let’s bring them that fight! It’s time to bring the noise! Stand up for what you deserve, for what everyone deserves; library run by qualified professionals.

It is worth noting that I have been informed that many staff working within the public library system have been told by their authorities that they are not allowed to become “politically involved” in the campaigns to protect their libraries. This is why it is so important for library users to make a stand. It is vital that people all over the country make a stand before these services are lost forever.

Sign the petitions, write letters, join campaigns in your regions, make a noise on social media,  turn out for libraries and, when the election comes, vote for the parties who make a solid commitment to making a difference.

You can find full lists of campaigns through the websites of Public Library News  and The Library Campaign – and make a noise as part of Voices for the Library

Follow CILIP ElectionWatch to stay informed about which parties are prepared to make a solid commitment to our communities, and you can see a list of key advocacy issues and campaigns here on their website. On social media please follow and use #CILIPElect and #vote4libraries

Speak Up For Libraries annual conference is held towards the end of the year and full write-ups and further information can be found by using the link above or follow @speakup4libs

You can start off by joining in the celebrations for National Libraries Day – and really bring the noise!

Don’t let this be another one of those issues where you’re left singing – Don’t it always seem to go, you don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone.

NB – if you work for a public library and have been advised to not get involved in campaigns, please feel free to post your stories anonymously in the comments here.

Written by Dawn Finch

Library and Literacy Consultant

Children’s author and librarian.

 

Those links again………

www.publiclibrariesnews.com/

www.librarycampaign.com/

www.voicesforthelibrary.org.uk/campaigns/

CILIP advocacy pages

http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/advocacy-campaigns-awards/advocacy-campaigns/public-libraries/public-libraries-cilip-activity

CILIP ElectionWatch

http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/advocacy-campaigns-awards/advocacy-campaigns/electionwatch-cilip-campaign