Lighting the way – Libraries and Wellbeing

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The CILIP Public and Mobile Libraries group this year hosted their first conference and the theme of the two day event was the contribution that libraries make to the wellbeing of their communities. The conference had a superbly well-timed focus as the link between reading and wellbeing has never been better documented. Over the past few years we have seen the publication of many robust reports that prove that reading and libraries are vital to the wellbeing and mental health of their communities.

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Over the two day event we heard from many speakers, all of whom had a direct involvement in the wellbeing agenda and how this relates to libraries. First up we heard from Paul Blantern, of the Sieghart Libraries Taskforce, who talked about the need for a national framework for libraries so that we could have a “consistent library offer” right across the country. During his talk he drew attention to the fact that libraries are often seen as the easy way to make cuts, but this will reflect upon the other services offered. He also talked about why libraries are important, what they offer to their communities, and how the Taskforce hopes to protect them.

Photo 12-10-2015 13 00 54One of the most interesting speakers of the day was Brian Ashley from from Arts Council England who talked about the financial impact of the library contribution to health and wellbeing. Brian’s talk was drawn from the Arts Council commissioned report “The Health and Wellbeing Benefits of Public Libraries”. His talk was filled with some astonishing data such as the fact that library users are more likely to report better health, and less likely to take trivial issues to a doctor. This relates to a saving of an estimated £25m a year to the NHS. Extraordinary figures, and it seems pure folly that this is not taken into account by Government.

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Mike Brook talked about the success of a Library Mental Health festival and he stressed the importance of the safe haven that a library provides for anyone with mental health issues. The need for this sort of space in our communities can’t be underestimated. He also talked about how to market and advertise the event so that it reached the right people.

Photo 12-10-2015 13 03 58The event also provided a number of workshops to help librarians support their communities in ways that they might not have previously considered. I chose to go to Jacquie Widdowson’s workshop on marketing and social media – an essential skill for the 21st Century Librarian! She gave invaluable advice on how to reach more people and how to extend the library welcome to people who might not have previously considered the library as their kind of space.
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I was particularly moved by the workshop that I attended run by Julie Walker. Julie is a Bibliotherapist who works with Kirklees Library (and others) and she talked about what bibliotherapy is and how it helps people. She explained how it supports vulnerable people and showed us just how powerful the right text is at the right time. During the workshop she handed out short extracts of carefully chosen poems and asked if people would like to read them aloud. The emotions that bounced around the room made for an amazing demonstration of just how powerful this service is.

Photo 12-10-2015 13 00 34We also heard talks about how Staffordshire is supporting the mental health and wellbeing agenda in their libraries, and Carol Brooks talked about how important personal resilience is. Alan Medway gave a presentation about Staffs libraries and their decision to support issues such as dementia via their library provision. The whole event was filled with inspiring and useful talks and was a great success.

My own talk was about the powerful positive impact that reading for pleasure can have on all of our lives, and how libraries can fit in with that. You can download my presentation below, and please drop me a line if you would like to ask me anything about it, or would like me to come and speak at your event.

Libraries offer a unique service as they are the trusted and safe spaces that exist in our communities. In order to successfully fulfill this agenda we require something very special in our communities – a professional librarian who is trusted, knowledgeable and reliable.

Libraries save lives, let’s make sure that everyone is aware of that, and that people are aware of exactly how much we will suffer as a society if we lose them.

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A selection of documents referred to during the 2015 CILIP Public and Mobile Libraries Conference.

Dawn Finch –PMLG conference presentation – slides

Arts Council England – Health and Wellbeing Benefits of Public Libraries – full report

Sieghart Report (Independent Report of Public Libraries)  – full report

Carnegie Trust – Speaking Volumes, Libraries and wellbeing leaflet and infographic – leaflet

Kirklees Council – Well Into Words (information about bibliotherapy)

Bibliotherapy in action – Well into Words – video

Reading Agency – Impact of Reading for Pleasure and Empowerment – full report

Article by Dawn Finch – Vice President of CILIP. Librarian, children’s author and literacy consultant

@dawnafinch

http://www.dawnfinch.com

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Reading – what’s in it for me?

library in the sky image

For those of us addicted to reading we know exactly how enjoyable it is, but in an increasingly busy world it is often hard to make time for it, so why should we bother? There is no doubt that reading improves literacy levels, and higher literacy levels allow people to gain better educational results, and in turn get better jobs, but is that enough of an incentive to make people want to read? Despite the evidence about the benefits of reading we still see reports in the news about falling national literacy levels and the decline in reading. The Reading Agency decided that in order to tackle this it was time to look beyond literacy levels and consider the wider personal benefits of reading for pleasure*.

The Reading Agency received generous funding from the Peter Sowerby Foundation for a collaborative project to develop a reading outcomes framework. The main aim of the project was to collate and summarise the findings of the most robust studies that related to non-literacy outcomes of reading for pleasure or empowerment*. A steering group was formed from the collaborative organisations and the report (conducted by BOP Consulting) was compiled. As Vice President of CILIP (the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals) I was invited to be part of the steering group, and I am delighted to now be able to share this report.

The report: The Impact of Reading for Pleasure and Empowerment, contains a powerful and undeniable message – reading is good for you.

The report confirms that people who read for pleasure benefit from a huge range of wider outcomes including increased empathy, alleviation or reduction in the symptoms of depression and dementia, as well as an improved sense of wellbeing. People who read for pleasure also have a higher sense of social inclusion, a greater tolerance and awareness of other cultures and lifestyles, and better communication skills. When we looked at the impact of reading for pleasure on people with increased health needs or issues, we found that people who were reading for pleasure demonstrated better health literacy, and were more able to cope with, and access, information related to their conditions. People who read for pleasure also showed lower levels of general anxiety.

For children and young people the evidence obviously demonstrated that children who read for pleasure had higher levels of educational attainment, but what is most interesting is how it improves the overall quality of their lives. Children and young people who read demonstrate significantly enhanced emotional vocabulary. In short, the young people who read like themselves better and cope with life better. They are more likely to use positive mental self -imagery and generally used more positive vocabulary in both their work and their lives.

This shows us that reading for pleasure is an important way of helping us to tackle issues such as social isolation, teenage depression, negative self-image, and social and educational disengagement. Reading for pleasure can make an isolated and depressed young person feel better about who they are and can make them more confident about the importance of their unique role in the world.

What can we do?
A key finding of the report is that extensive studies show that enjoyment of reading is a prerequisite for all these positive outcomes: people who choose to read, and enjoy doing so in their spare time, are more likely to reap all of these wider benefits. Negative attitudes towards reading for pleasure therefore have a much wider negative impact, and it’s essential that we create a far more positive attitude towards reading. We can throw out the “haven’t got time” and “reading is a waste of time” comments because we can clearly see that if you are reading for pleasure you are doing something that will improve the long-term quality of your life and your health.

It is worth noting that this process has to be about reading that is a free and voluntary choice. This is distinctly separate from learning how to read, and it is not the same as reading that is undertaken for study or educational purposes. In order to benefit from the wider outcomes of reading for pleasure we need to focus only on one word – pleasure. At school a focus should remain on uncritical free voluntary choice reading. Children and young people should be able to read freely from a wide range of material. They should be able to choose whatever format and style of reading material they want without feeling that it is yet another lesson or form of study. To facilitate this it is simply not enough to only have reading schemes and reading lessons, pupils of all ages require access to a well stocked school library and this will give them a better chance of becoming lifelong readers. To nurture a reading for pleasure environment all children should have access to someone who can help them to navigate the maze of books and reading in a positive way – logic dictates that this should be a school librarian.

Reading is good for you, and is something that we should all do at every stage in our lives in order to benefit personally. This should start at the cradle with reading aloud and sharing stories, and should move through our lives as pastime that is perceived as enjoyable. Reading is habit forming, and the children of readers read and are more likely to accept books and reading into their lives. We cannot expect our future adults to become readers if the only books they know are those on the reading scheme.

It doesn’t have to be expensive (remember, librarians are there to help you for free), and it doesn’t have to be great works of worthy literature. The evidence shows that all that matters is that people are reading a wide range of fiction and non-fiction in any form, and that they are reading it simply because they want to. No discrimination was made about the type of reading material, or the format – all reading is good reading as long as you are doing it because you have chosen to. We need to throw out the false idea that reading is an elitist or snobby pastime that is only for the idle, and that only “good” books matter – this is simply not true.

We are bombarded with health messages that we should be acting upon, but this report shows that reading for pleasure is the simplest and most enjoyable way to gain a significant number of long-term health benefits.

So stop feeling guilty! When you’re reading you’re not wasting time, you’re working on your long-term health.
The message is simple – pick up a book, and feel better!

Dawn Finch
Vice President CILIP
CWIG Committee
Children’s author and school library consultant.
www.dawnfinch.com
@dawnafinch

Links and the technical stuff…..
The full Literature Review document can be downloaded from the Reading Agency’s website and it contains a full bibliography of all of the research used. Please share and quote the report and use #readingforpleasure to keep the conversation going.

The Reading Agency worked in collaboration with the following organisations: Arts Council England, Association of Senior Children’s and Education Librarians, Book Trust, Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, Education Endowment Foundation, National Literacy Trust, Publishers Association, Scottish Library and Information Council, Society of Authors and the Society of Chief Librarians.
The report was compiled by BOP Consulting with funding from the Peter Sowerby Foundation 

* For the purposes of the report the phrases “reading for pleasure” and “recreational reading” are used interchangeably within the body of the document. We defined this as “non-goal orientated transactions with texts as a way to spend time, and for entertainment.”
The term “reading for empowerment” is (for the purposes of this report) defined as “transactions with texts as a means of self-cultivation and self-development beyond literacy”. For example reading non-fiction material such as craft or self-help books.
Both terms were used to define reading for pleasure and empowerment in all formats and media.

Full link URL – http://readingagency.org.uk/news/media/reading-for-pleasure-builds-empathy-and-improves-wellbeing-research-from-the-reading-agency-finds.html

The image used is licensed CCO public domain but courtesy credit due to bonnybbx, creator on Pixabay. Please always credit creators.